Bolton Home for Girls, Bolton, Lancashire

The Bolton Home for Girls was opened by the Waifs and Strays Society in 1907 at 'Wardleigh', 112/114 Radcliffe Road, Bolton. The property, a pair of houses knocked together into a single residence, could accommodate 40 girls from 5 to 15 years of age. The formal opening of the home took place on February 14th, 1907, with the Bishop of Manchester conducting the ceremony of dedication.

The location of the home is shown on the 1929 map below.

Bolton Home for Girls site, c.1929.

Bolton Home for Girls, Bolton, 1907. © Peter Higginbotham

Bolton Home for Girls, Bolton, 1907. © Peter Higginbotham

In 1923, the accommodation at the home was increased to 48 places. In the same year, mains electricity was connected and a local donor provided a wireless set for the girls' enjoyment.

Bolton Home for Girls, Bolton, c.1923. © Peter Higginbotham

Bolton Home for Girls, Bolton, c.1931. © Peter Higginbotham

The home closed in 1953. The building was then used as a hostel for trainee nurses. The property no longer survives and a care home now occupies the site.

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.