St Joseph's / St Teresa's School for Roman Catholic Children, Bristol, Gloucestershire

St Joseph's Roman Catholic Boys' and Girls' School, was established by the Sisters of Mercy at 2 Dighton Street, Bristol. On June 3rd, 1916, the School was certified to operate as an Industrial School for 25 boys aged under eight years of age and 45 girls aged under 16. An amendment to the certification on September 28th, 1917, specified that boys could not be detained in the School beyond the age of 10.

In the 1920s' the School was renamed St Teresa's.

In 1933, St Teresa's became an Approved School, one of the new institutions introduced by the 1933 Children and Young Persons Act to replace the existing system of Reformatories and Industrial Schools. The School now accommodated 70 Junior girls aged under 15 at their date of admission. St Teresa's gave up its Approved School status on November 6th, 1938.

The School premises subsequently formed part of the adjacent Convent of Mercy. The main convent building still stands but the School section no longer exists.

Former Convent of Mercy, Dighton Road, Bristol, 2013. © Peter Higginbotham

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

  • No records noted at present for this establishment — any information welcome.

Bibliography

  • Mahood, Linda Policing Gender, Class and Family: Britain, 1850-1940 (1995, Univeristy of Alberta Press)
  • Prahms, Wendy Newcastle Ragged and Industrial School (2006, The History Press)
  • Hyland, Jim Yesterday's Answers: Development and Decline of Schools for Young Offenders (1994, Whiting and Birch)
  • Millham, S, Bullock, R, and Cherrett, P After Grace - Teeth: a comparative study of the residential experience of boys in Approved Schools (1975, Chaucer Publishing)
  • None noted at present.