Charlton House Home for Girls, Gloucester, Gloucestershire

A Training Home for Girls was established in around 1885 by the Gloucester Branch of the Ladies' Association for the Care of Friendless Girls. By the mid-1890s, the home was operating at Charlton House, 48 Barton Street, Gloucester though may have previously been based at 5 Priory Place. Its object was 'the industrial training of girls of 12 to 16 who, by the poverty or bad influences of their homes, are in difficulty or danger.' In 1901, there were 18 girls in residence aged from 8 to 16, with Miss Jane Hellin as Matron.

In about 1906, the home was taken over by the Waifs and Strays Society and plans and plans made to construct a new building in a more salubrious location. From around this date, the home's address is given as 87 Barton Street, although this may simply be due to a renumbering of the properties on the road. It is not clear whether any move ever took place.

The home closed in 1915. The Charlton House building no longer survives and the site is now occupied by part of the GL1 leisure centre.

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.