Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys, Knutsford, Cheshire

In 1913, the Waifs and Strays Society home took over the former Grammar School premises on the Northwich Road at The Heath, Knutsford. The property, which could accommodate 50 boys aged from 7 to 14, was given by Mr Claude Hardy, who also offered an annual donation of £5 per boy at the home. At Mr Hardy's request, the home was named after Emmeline Winstanley, but her identity is not known.

The location of the home is shown on the 1909 map below, when the property was still occupied by a local Grammar School.

Emmeline Winstanley Home location, Knutsford, c.1909.

Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys from the north-east, Knutsford, 1917. © Peter Higginbotham

Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys, Knutsford, c.1917. © Peter Higginbotham

Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys, Knutsford, c.1930. © Peter Higginbotham

Morris dancing was a pastime in which boys at the home were very active.

Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys, Knutsford, c.1923. © Peter Higginbotham

Emmeline Winstanley Home For Boys, Knutsford, c.1925. © Peter Higginbotham

Emmeline Winstanley Home Boys dancing before Princess Mary Viscount Lascelles, c.1929. © Peter Higginbotham

The photograph below was kindly contributed by former inmate, Graham Thompson. Taken on Knutsford Heath, immediately opposite the home, it features himself and one of his older brothers who was also a resident.

Outside Emmeline Winstanley Home for Boys, early 1950s.

Another picture from Graham shows him and two of his brothers, again on Knutsford Heath.

Outside Emmeline Winstanley Home for Boys, early 1950s.

The home closed in 1956. The property was later occupied by infants' department of St Vincent's Roman Catholic Primary School and was known as Winstanley House. The school moved to a new site in 1967. A new building, which retained the name Winstanley House, was erected on the site in 1975, containing sheltered housing accommodation.

Records

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Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.