St Michael's Home for Boys, Highweek, Newton Abbot, Devon

The St Michael's Home for Boys was opened by the Waifs and Strays Society in 1898 at Highweek, near Newton Abbot. It replaced the home's previous premises at Lyme Regis. The Highweek home could accommodate 18 boys, aged from 7 to 10 years.

St Michael's Home for Boys, Highweek, Newton Abbot, c.1901. © Peter Higginbotham

St Michael's Home for Boys, Highweek, Newton Abbot, c.1903. © Peter Higginbotham

In the summertime, a variety of holiday activities were organised for the boys. On August 19th August, 1908, the boys were driven in brakes to Pitt House Chudleigh, where they were entertained for the afternoon by Captain E.F. Morrison-Bell M.P. and his wife. In August 1913, they made camp at the Vicarage Field, Seaton, under the charge of the home's Master, Mr Driscoll.

At the expiry of the property's lease in 1920, the home was closed and the boys dispersed to other Society homes.

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.