Shrewsbury Cottage Home / St Saviour's Home for Girls, Shrewsbury, Shropshire

The Shrewsbury Cottage Home founded in 1882 in a small house at Montague Place, Shrewsbury. It was run by a Miss Butler, with support from the Lichfield Diocese, for girls who 'have been led into sin, and are unfitted for reception in ordinary schools or training Homes.' The girls were trained to prepare them for domestic service.

In 1887, the home became affiliated to the Waifs and Strays Society. Three years later, it relocated to a larger property at 3 Belle Vue Gardens, and took the name St Saviour's. The new premises were formally opened by the Bishop of Lichfield on March 31st, 1890.

St Saviour's Home for Girls, Shrewsbury, c.1926. © Peter Higginbotham

In 1891, there were 15 girls in residence aged from 7 to 15. The matron was Miss Flora Smith, assisted by Constance Wilson.

On New Year's Days, 1893, the home was formally taken over by the Society as its St Saviour's Home for Girls.

The Belle Vue Gardens property no longer survives.

Records

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Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.