St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, Middlesex

St Ursula's Home for Girls was opened in 1912 by the Waifs and Strays Society at Amberley House, 44 Hampton Road, Teddington. On 23rd February, 1912, it was certified as an Industrial School, with accommodation for up to 25 girls placed there by magistrates. St Ursula's had a special role in receiving girls who had 'been the victims of immoral treatment'.

In 1918, the home relinquished its Industrial School role and became an ordinary branch home for 30 girls aged 7 to 16.

St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, c.1912. © Peter Higginbotham

St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, c.1912. © Peter Higginbotham

St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, c.1912. © Peter Higginbotham

St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, c.1921. © Peter Higginbotham

In 1930, the cost of making the rented building fit for continued occupation was such that it decided to close the home. That year's Christmas party was attended by fourteen 'old girls' of the home.

Last group at St Ursula's Home for Girls, Teddington, 1931. © Peter Higginbotham

The property is now in private residential use.

Records

Note: many repositories impose a closure period of up to 100 years for records identifying individuals.

Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.