The Home of The Good Shepherd For Girls, Stockport, Cheshire

The Home of The Good Shepherd For Girls was founded in about 1891 by the Rev. Arthur Symonds. It occupied premises at 20 St Thomas Place, Stockport.

The home was run as industrial school, providing accommodation, training and religious instruction for poor girls, so that they would be employable, in most cases as domestic servants. The training was in household skill such as laundry work and house-work. On November 20th, 1893, the home was officially certified by the Local Government Board to receive girls from the poor law authorities for a fee of £13 a year.

In 1894, the home was taken over by the Waifs and Strays Society home. However, the property was found to be too expensive to maintain and the home was closed in 1898, with the girls being transferred to the Society's St Barnabas' at New Brighton.

The Thomas Place building no longer survives.

Records

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Bibliography

  • Bowder, Bill Children First: a photo-history of England's children in need (1980, Mowbray)
  • Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society [Rudolfe, Edward de Montjoie] The First Forty Years: a chronicle of the Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society 1881-1920 (1922, Church of England Waifs and Strays' Society / S.P.C.K.)
  • Rudolf, Mildred de Montjoie Everybody's Children: the story of the Church of England Children's Society 1921-1948 (1950, OUP)
  • Stroud, John Thirteen Penny Stamps: the story of the Church of England Children's Society (Waifs and Strays) from 1881 to the 1970s (1971, Hodder and Stoughton)
  • Morris, Lester The Violets Are Mine: Tales of an Unwanted Orphan (2011, Xlibris Corporation) — memoir of a boy growing up in several of the Society's homes (Princes Risborough, Ashdon, Hunstanton, Leicester) in the 1940s and 50s.